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January 28, 1933

HOOKWORM DISEASE IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC: TEN YEARS OF TETRACHLORIDES

JAMA. 1933;100(4):247-248. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740040015006
Abstract

In November, 1921, Maurice C. Hall recommended carbon tetrachloride as a hookworm anthelmintic for man. In February, 1922, I began to use this drug in Fiji for mass treatment of the population. In the course of the next ten years, 286,486 persons in the South Pacific islands were treated, under my personal observation, with carbon tetrachloride, tetrachlorethylene, or these drugs in combination with oil of chenopodium. This number included Melanesians, Polynesians, East Indians, and a few thousand Europeans and Chinese. The majority of the treatments were of carbon tetrachloride or tetrachlorethylene. Seven deaths occurred among the persons treated between 1922 and 1924. Since then, no fatalities have resulted from the administration of the tetrachlorides.

The seven deaths were all among East Indians. One of them occurred after a dose of oil of chenopodium which was not followed by a purge. The others followed the administration of carbon tetrachloride. One of

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