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Article
January 28, 1933

THE FEDERAL FOOD AND DRUGS ACT AND THE PHYSICIAN

Author Affiliations

Chief, Drug Control, Food and Drug Administration WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1933;100(4):249-251. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740040017007

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Abstract

In 1906 I was an errand boy and soda dispenser in a drug store in Kokomo, Ind. I was assigned the added task of invoicing all "patent" and proprietary medicines on the shelves of the store, and of writing manufacturers stating the number of bottles or packages of their medicines we had in stock. The manufacturers then furnished me with small stickers to paste on each package, stating the content of alcoholic, narcotic or other drugs required by the new national pure food and drug law to be declared on the labels—also stickers stating, "Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act of 1906." These I attached to all packages. That was about the extent of my knowledge of the Food and Drugs Act before becoming associated with the federal Food and Drug Administration, in 1929. Since that date I have questioned numerous physicians and dentists and I find that their

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