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Article
June 19, 1926

USE OF INJECTED IODIZED OIL IN ROENTGEN-RAY DIAGNOSISOF LARYNGEAL, TRACHEAL AND BRONCHO-PULMONARY CONDITIONS

JAMA. 1926;86(25):1879-1884. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670510001001
Abstract

The introduction of a contrast substance into the bronchial tree as an aid to roentgenographic diagnosis was first practiced by Jackson.1 For the purpose of lung mapping he employed dry bismuth subcarbonate, which was insufflated through a bronchoscope.

In 1918, Stewart and the late Dr. Lynah2 demonstrated excellent roentgenograms of pulmonary abscesses and bronchiectatic cavities which had been filled with an emulsion of bismuth in olive oil.

The endobronchial injection of lipiodol, an iodized vegetable oil containing 40 per cent of iodine by weight, was first practiced by Sicard and Forestier3 after they had successfully employed it in the spinal canal and other body cavities. The oil and iodine are firmly bound and, owing to its marked radiopacity and nonirritating qualities, lipiodol has proved to be an excellent medium for bronchography.

Forestier and Leroux,4 Sergent and Cottenot5 and others repeated the experiments with gratifying results.

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