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Article
February 4, 1933

TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY OCCLUSION

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Medicine, University of California Medical School.

JAMA. 1933;100(5):315-318. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740050011004
Abstract

Among the common medical emergencies there are few if any that receive treatment so poor as that of coronary thrombosis—poor in the sense of an average so far below the best that even present knowledge makes possible. For this condition the layman's ignorance is first responsible. A considerable number of such patients do not feel sick enough to call a doctor, and, if they do not recover by good luck, make their first medical contact with the coroner. By the use of such means of publicity as are possible, at the risk of creating some unnecessary fears, it should be taught that for middle-aged and older persons "ptomaine poisoning" and "acute indigestion" are usually serious mistakes in identity, and that "pleuritic pains" and "neuritis" of the chest, neck, jaw or arms deserve immediate painstaking diagnostic scrutiny. So far as possible, prophylaxis also should be taught, which is the difficult one

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