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Article
June 19, 1926

THE TECHNIC OF MEDICATION: A SERIES OF ARTICLES ON THE METHODS OF PRESCRIBING AND PREPARING, THE INDICATIONS FOR, AND THE USES OF VARIOUS MEDICAMENTS

Author Affiliations

Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Rush Medical College CHICAGO

JAMA. 1926;86(25):1909-1911. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.26720510005014
Abstract

Medicated Enemas.  —Medicated enemas for diacolonic action should, as previously stated, be given in the smallest bulk possible provided irritation is minimized by sufficient dilution. Starch water, being more efficient in lessening irritation, should be regularly employed as a diluent whenever such is required. Infusion of digitalis may be administered by rectum in tablespoonful doses, and even be made to carry a moderate dose of potassium acetate if desired. The following medicaments are generally well retained when given in the form of micro-enemas (30 cc.): tincture of opium, 1 cc.; chloral hydrate, from 1 to 2 Gm.; sodium salicylate, 2 Gm.; caffeine sodiobenzoate, 0.2 Gm. In prescribing enemas, the medicating ingredients are ordered from the apothecaries in pure form or in solution, which is then diluted, if necessary, with water, salt solution, or best starch water just before administration. Thus, in the treatment of infantile convulsions, we might prescribe chloral

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