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February 4, 1933

THE TYPHUS AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER GROUPDEVELOPMENTS IN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS

JAMA. 1933;100(5):331-334. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740050027008
Abstract

In the United States, efficient modern quarantine procedure, based on the newer scientific knowledge of the sources and modes of infection, has in recent years created an effective barrier against the introduction of epidemic typhus fever, and the higher standards of personal hygiene and environmental sanitation tend to hinder development of the disease within our borders.

Epidemic typhus is a disease of high communicability and high mortality, occurring in temperate and in cold zones, in the winter and in the spring, associated with filth and overcrowding and transmitted from man to man by the body louse, Pediculus humanus var. corporis.

On this continent, a variety known as tabardillo has been recognized in Mexico since the Spanish Conquest, though Sambon and Mooser present evidence that it existed there before that time.

Typhus was first differentiated from typhoid by Gerhard, who studied the Philadelphia epidemic of 1836. Several large epidemics occurred in

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