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Article
July 3, 1926

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF RENAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTION: THEIR APPLICATION TO THE MANAGEMENT OF NEPHRITIS

JAMA. 1926;87(1):8-15. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680010008003
Abstract

The functions of the kidney can be readily outlined. Regarding renal physiology, however, such a great mass of apparently contradictory data has accumulated that various opposing theories of the modus operandi have been advanced. This has resulted from the fact, as Richards 1 has stated, that the intricacy of the structure of the kidney and its compactness of mass have prevented the development of analytic experiments of compelling force. Concomitant with and resulting from these studies of renal physiology and function, many tests have been elaborated for the purpose of exposing the inability of the kidney to carry out one or more of its several functions. A brief survey may be useful to differentiate such knowledge of practical importance to clinical medicine from that of less direct or only theoretical bearing.

FUNCTIONS OF THE KIDNEY  There are four established functions of the kidney: (1) the excretion of certain nonvolatile end-products

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