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Article
February 18, 1933

THE HAZARDS OF INTRAPERITONEAL INJECTIONS

Author Affiliations

GREENSBORO, N. C.

JAMA. 1933;100(7):473-475. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740070011004
Abstract

Intraperitoneal injections of physiologic solution of sodium chloride, first introduced by Blackfan and Maxcy1 in 1918, have been employed extensively in the treatment of dehydration in infants. More recently the administration of dextrose,2 diphtheria antitoxin,3 neoarsphenamine,4 iron5 and blood6 has been recommended by this route. Some authors7 have considered typing or cross agglutination unnecessary preliminary to this method of blood transfusion.

The use of the intraperitoneal route permits more rapid introduction into the body of relatively larger quantities of fluid than is possible by hypodermoclysis. It is also easier than venipuncture; hence its popularity in the treatment of infants by physicians in the numerous small hospitals in which interns are not available.

Some of the dangers of this procedure, as illustrated by the cases reported in this article, are:

  1. Perforation of the intestine.

  2. The introduction of incompatible blood into the circulation.

  3. Hemorrhage from

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