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Article
July 17, 1926

GIANT-CELL SARCOMA APPARENTLY ARISING FROM THE APONEUROSIS OF THE FOREARM

JAMA. 1926;87(3):167-168. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.92680030003008b
Abstract

Giant-cell sarcomas of tendon sheaths of the hands and feet have been known for fifty years. They were especially observed by French writers, who termed them "myeloma" or "xanthosarcoma." They also may arise from the aponeurosis. Spiess,1 who reviewed the subject in 1913, believes they should be called "hemosiderin-producing giant-cell xanthosarcomas."

These tumors are benign and never metastasize. After a thorough removal, recurrence is a rarity. They may take as long as twenty years to develop to the size of a nut or egg. They are not painful, and the majority occur between the ages of 20 and 40.

As these tumors generally arise from the tendon sheaths and aponeurosis of the hand, the following case, in which the tumor apparently arose from the aponeurosis of investment of the forearm, is deemed of sufficient interest to report:

Mrs. E., aged 34, two years previously had a severe fall,

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