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Article
March 4, 1933

THE USE OF THE DRINKER RESPIRATOR IN THE AFTER-CARE OF INFANTILE PARALYSIS

JAMA. 1933;100(9):647-648. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740090019006

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Abstract

The use of the respirator in the acute stage of infantile paralysis has saved the lives of many patients with respiratory involvement.

Not only was the mortality of infantile paralysis with involvement of the muscles of respiration much greater before the invention of this machine, but many of those who survived died subsequently with some lung disease resulting from diminished aeration.

In the after-care clinic of the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission, we have seen a considerable number of the patients who have survived this type of the disease and we have been impressed by the marked depression deformities that have developed in the chests of those who have not recovered the power of voluntary expansion of the chest.

The exact type of the deformity depends on the location and extent of the paralysis of the muscles of respiration. It is fairly common to find breathing carried on by the diaphragm

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