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March 11, 1933

PERSISTENT DERMATITISAN UNUSUAL SEQUELA OF RADICAL OPERATION FOR TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

JAMA. 1933;100(10):722-724. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740100016006
Abstract

Modern neurologic surgery has decreased to a negligible factor the mortality following radical operations for major trigeminal neuralgia. Improvement in the technic of operative approach has decreased the complications and undesirable sequelae so materially that a person suffering from this distressing condition need have no hesitation in submitting to this operation. However, for the past two years I have observed a patient who developed an unusual condition following operation on the gasserian ganglion.

REPORT OF CASE  A married woman, aged 41, came to the clinic, March 13, 1930, because of a pain and a burning sensation on the left side of her face. She was from a family of ten children, two of whom had died from epilepsy. Otherwise there was nothing of significant interest in the family history. She had had measles, mumps, scarlet fever, whooping cough, tonsillitis and influenza. She gave a history of having had attacks of

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