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Article
July 31, 1926

OSTEOCHONDRITIS, OR EPIPHYSITIS: A REVIEW

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1926;87(5):291-295. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680050001001
Abstract

A brief consideration of the anatomy of the epiphyses will appropriately precede a review of our knowledge of the pathologic condition that has been variously named osteochondritis, epiphysitis and osteochondropathy, and which in special regions of the body has been given many descriptive designations or has been named after its discoverer or discoverers.

John Poland's 1 description in 1898 of the anatomy of the epiphyses has not been improved on, and the facts here presented are in accordance with his findings.

All the long bones have an epiphysis at each end, with the exception of the metacarpals, the metatarsals, the phalanges of the hands and feet, and the clavicle, all of which have an epiphysis at only one end.

The epiphyses, at birth, are composed of cartilage, with the exception of those of the lower end of the femur and the upper end of the tibia, which are partly ossified.

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