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Article
July 31, 1926

THE INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF SODIUM CHLORIDE IN BROMODERMA

JAMA. 1926;87(5):320-321. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680050030013
Abstract

Because of the frequent occurrence of bromine and its salts in various "patent medicines," and its long-continued use in epilepsy and as a sedative in nervous disorders, cutaneous manifestations from its use are rather frequent. Waugh 1 clearly brings out this fact in a report of a case of bromoderma occurring in a man, aged 40, who had taken bromo-seltzer regularly for a period of two years. In an investigation of bromo-seltzer Waugh found that 1 drachm (4 Gm.) of the drug contained 7 grains (0.5 Gm.), the usual dose being half an ounce, and that one large drugstore in Chicago sold almost 1,500 pounds in a year's time. The pound size bromo-seltzer bottle always occupies a conspicuous place on our own soda fountains, and, therefore, it is also apparently consumed in large quantities in New York.

Bromism may appear after only a few days steady use of the drug,

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