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Article
August 7, 1926

PSEUDOHYPERTHROPHIC MUSCULAR PARALYSIS: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A CLINICAL STUDY OF THIRTY-NINE CASES

JAMA. 1926;87(6):399-404. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680060023008
Abstract

This condition is variously known as pseudohypertrophic muscular paralysis, progressive muscular dystrophy, or iodiopathic muscular atrophy. Myopathies are primary diseases of the muscular system characterized by weakness and wasting (with or without an initial enlargement) of the muscles, and not due to a primary lesion in the nervous system.

Barnes classifies the myopathies as:

  1. True myopathies:

    1. Pseudohypertrophic muscular paralysis.

    2. Juvenile type (Erb).

    3. Facioscapulohumeral type (Landouzy-Dejerine).

  2. Allied types:

    1. Distal type (Gowers).

    2. Myotonia congenita (Thomsen).

    3. Hypertrophic musculorum vera (Spiller).

    4. Transition types.

  3. Type sui generis:

    1. Amyotonia congenita (myotonia congenita of Oppenheim).

Sachs' classification of primary dystrophies is as follows:

According to Naccarati, there are the following types:

Infantile type of Werdnig-Hoffman, due to degeneration of the lower motor neurons.

  • Juvenile type, or scapulohumeral type of Erb.

  • Facioscapulohumeral type of Landouzy-Dejerine.

  • Pseudohypertrophic paralysis of Duchenne.

  • Hereditary type of Leyden, Moebius.

These types may be various manifestations of the same entity.

Generally speaking, if definite

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