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Article
March 25, 1933

BASIC CONSIDERATIONS IN MINORITY REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE COSTS OF MEDICAL CARE

JAMA. 1933;100(12):863-867. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740120001001
Abstract

Timeliness or untimeliness cannot, to my mind, be considered valid argument for the acceptability or the nonacceptability of a theory or of a social program. The advocates of the majority report of the Committee on the Costs of Medical Care, those in professional ranks as well as those in the lay ranks, are fond of stressing the thought that the recommendations of the majority are a direct response to the needs of today and that they parallel to a remarkable extent today's social trends and tendencies. Attributing to this laudatory statement its full value, it is clear that the acceptability of the recommendations of the majority rests entirely, as far as this argument is concerned, on the acceptability or the nonacceptability of today's trends and tendencies. If the latter are desirable or acceptable, then in all likelihood their outgrowth may participate in the acceptability or nonacceptability of the parent stem.

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