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Article
April 1, 1933

TREATMENT OF LOCALIZED STAPHYLOCOCCIC INFECTIONS WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS TOXOID

Author Affiliations

Research Assistant and Clinical Associate, Connaught Laboratories, University of Toronto TORONTO

JAMA. 1933;100(13):1007-1010. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740130011003
Abstract

In 1928 an immunologic disaster occurred at Bundaberg, Queensland, which resulted in the death, within twenty-four hours, of twelve children out of twenty-one injected with diphtheria toxin-antitoxin mixture, subsequently proved to be contaminated with Staphylococcus. Since the publication of the report of the royal commission1 appointed to inquire into these fatalities, there has been a noteworthy revival of interest in the toxigenic properties of the staphylococcus. It would be out of place here either to offer an historical survey of published work on staphylococcus filtrates or even to discuss in detail the various properties that have been attributed to them. But mention should be made of the work of Burnet,2 which has received confirmation and amplification from many quarters, establishing the fact that under appropriate environmental conditions certain strains of staphylococci will produce a true exotoxin.

STAPHYLOCOCCUS EXOTOXIN  The effects of this toxin on the cells and tissues

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