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Article
August 21, 1926

THE CLINICAL CLERKSHIP IN MEDICINE: DETAILS OF A METHOD OF INSTRUCTION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Second (Cornell) Medical Division of Bellevue Hospital.

JAMA. 1926;87(8):542-545. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680080008003
Abstract

The problems of medical instruction are the same as those of education in general, modified only by the nature of the subject. The aim of all intelligent pedagogy is to teach the student to teach himself. In order that this may be done effectively, he must be taught to think independently and be inspired to continue to study and enjoy his work after the immediate contact with the school has ended.

The difficulties that stand in the way of the realization of this goal are many. Most students are poorly prepared for such a method of instruction, and better immediate results are obtained with weak material by "spoon feeding." Such an objection, of course, is merely an explanation for shirking duty. Material must be accepted as it comes and developed without wasting time on complaints. Predigested instruction is like spoon feeding a child for fear of having him spill some

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