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Article
April 15, 1933

DEXTROSE THERAPY IN DISEASES OF THE LIVER

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Medicine, University of California Medical School.

JAMA. 1933;100(15):1163-1167. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740150021008
Abstract

The first clinician to advocate treatment of an hepatic disease with dextrose was A. P. Beddard,1 in 1908. In 1915, Opie and Alford2 and, independently, Graham3 furnished the experimental basis for this therapy by demonstrating that feeding of carbohydrate lessens the susceptibility of rats and dogs to necrosis of the liver caused by chloroform and by phosphorus. Later this was confirmed by Davis and Whipple4 for chloroform poisoning, while Davis5 demonstrated the same effect in intoxication by carbon tetrachloride.

THERAPEUTIC ADMINISTRATION OF DEXTROSE  In recent years much interest has been shown in dextrose as a remedy for a variety of disorders of the liver. Experimentally, in addition to its protective influence against hepatic poisons, administration of dextrose has been shown to compensate partially for functional deficiency of the liver induced by Eck fistula6 and by hepatectomy.7 In acute intoxications following intraperitoneal injections of

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