[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 28, 1926

THE INORGANIC COMPOSITION OF BONE AND BLOOD

JAMA. 1926;87(9):674-675. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680090052019
Abstract

It has long been realized that the bones are a storehouse of phosphorus and calcium in particular. Probably more than 99 per cent of the latter element in the body belongs to the bones. Eighty-five per cent of their mineral matter can be accounted for as calcium phosphate. Curiosity naturally arises with respect to the variations that the bones may undergo in their mineral make-up under varying conditions of health and of disease. One of the final contributions of the late John Howland5 of Johns Hopkins University dealt in a characteristically thorough manner with the problem of the nature of the inorganic salts in rachitic and nonrachitic bones. Mineral analyses of these have often been reported; for the most part, however, the technic has been unsatisfactory. According to these studies the calcium phosphate in all bones, rachitic and nonrachitic, appears to be tricalcium phosphate. Different bones of the same

×