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Article
August 28, 1926

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF POLIOMYELITIS

JAMA. 1926;87(9):691-692. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680090069033

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —From time to time the possibility of milk-borne epidemics of poliomyelitis has been considered. In corroboration of statements made in the article by Dr. Aycock (The Journal, July 10), I wish to report the analysis of sixty cases of poliomyelitis handled by the Los Angeles County Health Department in 1925. There were thirty-two males and twenty-eight females, with ages as follows:It will be noticed that there were 6⅔ per cent under 1 year, 40 per cent between 1 and 3 years, and 73 per cent of the total number under 8 years of age, proving that in this series the youngest children were by far the more susceptible but that a small percentage of adults and older children may contract the disease.There were four families with two cases, and in each one of these the onset was so close together that it furnishes more evidence

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