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Article
September 4, 1926

CHRONIC NONSPECIFIC INFECTIONS OF THE LUNGSTHEIR BRONCHOSCOPIC AND ESOPHAGEAL PHASES

JAMA. 1926;87(10):729-736. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680100013004
Abstract

As the late D. Braden Kyle used to teach, the fundamentals in the treatment of disease are: What is the lesion? Where is it located? What is its cause? In investigation into all these fundamental questions, in cases of chronic lung suppuration, the bronchoscope can render invaluable aid in certain selected cases. The pediatrician can tap, look and listen on the outside; the roentgenologist can look through the patient; the bronchoscopist can look at the lesion inside the lung. With proper cooperation we have here a team that will work out the best possible end-results for the patient. It seems scarcely necessary to add that, except in foreign body cases, the bronchoscopist is merely an assistant whose aid is sought when needed to contribute to diagnosis or treatment. It would be utterly unjustifiable for him to undertake alone the diagnosis and treatment of lung suppuration.

J. C. Gittings, 1 a

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