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Article
April 22, 1933

PERMANENT ENLARGEMENT OF THE LIPS AND FACE: SECONDARY TO RECURRING SWELLINGS AND ASSOCIATED WITH FACIAL PARALYSIS: A CLINICAL ENTITY

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Otolaryngology, the Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Laryngology, Oral and Plastic Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1933;100(16):1230-1233. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740160014006
Abstract

During the last twenty-two years, sixty-seven patients presenting chronic, noninflammatory, permanent enlargement of the lips and face have been observed in the Mayo Clinic. This condition has followed repeated swellings and has been associated with facial paralysis in thirteen cases. The condition comes on suddenly in a manner similar to angioneurotic edema, and then, with recurrence of attacks, increasing enlargement is a residue. The condition is apparently a clinical entity, but we have been able to find only slight mention of it in the literature. The results of treatment of the condition have been satisfactory.

LITERATURE  The acute, circumscribed swelling described by Quincke1 in 1882 corresponds with the onset of the condition, but Quincke did not mention the residual enlargement. In Quincke's edema, although the swelling has a preference for certain regions, such as the eyelids, cheeks, lips and hands, it does not always recur in the same area.

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