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Article
April 29, 1933

THE COLOR OF THE NASAL SEPTUM: CRITICAL STUDY OF ITS SUPPOSED VALUE AS AN INDEX FOR DIETARY THERAPY IN DISEASES OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Otolaryngology and the Department of Chemistry (Nelson Morris Memorial Institute), Michael Reese Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;100(17):1324-1326. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740170022006
Abstract

In recent years the belief has been voiced by Jarvis and others that respiratory symptoms and pathologic changes in the respiratory system are brought about by faulty acid-base metabolism. Jarvis and his group have expressed the opinion that the color of the mucous membrane of the nasal septum is an index of the acid-base balance in the body: pale septums being present in states of alkalosis, red septums in acidosis. The group of patients with pale septums, according to Jarvis,1 show a history of having eaten excessive amounts of foods producing alkaline ash and are susceptible to hay fever, asthma, hyperesthetic rhinitis, coryza and bronchial infection, whereas the patients with red septums give a history of having eaten excessive amounts of acid-producing foods and suffer from anorexia, lassitude, emotional instability, irritability, constipation, dry skin, insomnia, fatigue and repeated infections.

The treatment that Jarvis and his group propose for both

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