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Article
May 13, 1933

A SIMPLE AND CERTAIN METHOD OF CONFINING THE HANDS DURING OPERATION

JAMA. 1933;100(19):1490. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740190016007

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Abstract

Other surgeons than myself must be dissatisfied at times with the usual methods employed to confine a patient's hands on the operating table. The widely used leather cuff fits inexactly about the forearm and, especially in women whose arms are stout but whose hands are small, does not prevent the hand from being withdrawn through it. This happens at particular points during an operation and in relation to definite stimuli that get through to the patient's sensorium: 1. It occurs after the operative field has been draped and during the induction of deep anesthesia. 2. The patient who is being placed under a light degree of inhalation anesthesia, analgesia having been obtained with local infiltration or nerve block, may, if he is of an excitable temperament, move his hands continuously during the operation. 3. The patient may free them when a new portion of the field is invaded, particularly when

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