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Article
May 20, 1933

THE RELATION OF TRAUMA TO PARALYSIS AGITANS

JAMA. 1933;100(20):1602-1603. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740200036013
Abstract

Since James Parkinson wrote his classic "Essay on the Shaking Palsy" (.1817) there has been much discussion as to the cause and pathogenesis of paralysis agitans. Recently the relation of trauma to the development of Parkinson's syndrome has been discussed in French and German literature. Ruhemann1 found that of thirty-five cases of paralysis agitans seven were traceable to trauma. Oppenheim2 wrote that injuries to the head, sacrum or an extremity, especially a crushing injury of the nerves, may be the cause of paralysis agitans. Catola3 comments on the difficulties in evaluating the relation between trauma and disease of the nervous system from the medicolegal point of view but admits that craniocerebral trauma may provoke vascular lesions, necrosis and neuroglial proliferation.

Recently Naville and de Morsier4 made an extensive report on trauma as a factor in Parkinson's disease. They studied two groups of cases: first, a series

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