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Article
June 3, 1933

THE DIATHERMY TREATMENT OF DEMENTIA PARALYTICA: MICROSCOPIC CHANGES IN TREATED CASES

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From St. Elizabeth's Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;100(22):1749-1753. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740220015005
Abstract

The disadvantages of malaria in the treatment of dementia paralytica are manifold. The strain is difficult to keep going outside of large clinics, the fever is uncontrollable, immunity often develops so quickly that a full course of fever is impossible, and serious complications or even death may result from the induced disease. The prospect of being able to secure equal results with greater control and less danger is therefore engaging, and with this in mind, artificial fever provoked by diathermy has been introduced into a number of clinics, and almost universally favorable results have been reported. From a survey of the literature, table 1 has been contructed. We have been unable to reproduce these results. Diathermy was introduced at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in August, 1928, and has been used in fifty cases, the experiment being concluded in June, 1932. Forty of

the patients were Negroes who had been unsuccessfully inoculated

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