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Article
October 30, 1926

EPIGASTRIC HERNIA: A CONSIDERATION OF ITS IMPORTANCE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF GASTRO-INTESTINAL DISEASE

JAMA. 1926;87(18):1466-1470. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680180038010
Abstract

Epigastric hernia may be defined as a rupture usually not larger than a walnut occurring in the linea alba between the umbilicus and the ensiform cartilage. Although this disease is not uncommon, insufficient attention has been accorded its importance. This is largely due to the fact that as many of these hernias are reducible, and disappear in the recumbent posture, the position in which patients affected with abdominal disorders are ordinarily examined, they are frequently overlooked.

Arnauld de Villeneuve, in 1285, was the first to call attention to this variety of hernia, while Garengeot1 in 1743 recognized this condition as a cause of obscure abdominal symptoms. Gunz, 2 in 1744, described the disease as gastric hernia (gastrocele) in the belief that the stomach was included in the sac because of the gastric symptoms so commonly noted.

In 1785, A. G. Richter3 reported a number of instances of this

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