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Article
June 24, 1933

PROGRESS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF TUBERCULOSIS: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE X-RAYS

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1933;100(25):2004-2006. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740250026007
Abstract

During the past five years, progress in tuberculosis has advanced very rapidly. Apparently, it has been a golden age as far as practical diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive work is concerned. Advances are being made in so many places that it is becoming difficult for one to keep informed on even the major activities. While reading an article on tuberculosis, published about 1917, I was impressed with the quite recent origin of several present well established facts. The contrast was as apparent as that between an article on malaria fever published in 1824 and one published in 1932.

In the first half of the last decade the foundation was laid, and during the second half the superstructure was being built. Controversy and debate have been replaced, for the most part, by work, which is resulting in actual accomplishment. There are still a few so-called controversial questions, such as: 1. Is the

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