[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1, 1933

ROENTGENOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION OF SUBPERIOSTEAL HEMORRHAGE IN INFANTILE SCURVY

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Children's Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati.

JAMA. 1933;101(1):14-17. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740260016004
Abstract

The criteria for the roentgenographic diagnosis of infantile scurvy have been adequately established and described by Fraenkel,1 Hess,2 Wimberger,3 Pelkan,4 McLean and McIntosh,5 Bromer,6 Kato7 and others. These authors have demonstrated that such scorbutic changes in the bones as increased density at the end of the diaphysis, increased density around the epiphyseal centers (rimming of the nucleus of ossification in the epiphysis), ground-glass appearance of the shaft of the diaphysis and of the body of the epiphysis, thinning of the cortex of the diaphysis, lateral spurs at the end of the diaphysis, and epiphyseal separation (separation of the metaphysis) can usually be seen on the roentgenogram before the occurrence of subperiosteal hemorrhage. Kato believes that the last mentioned is the one sign that is absolutely unique in infantile scurvy. While not, therefore, an early or even a necessary sign of scurvy, subperiosteal hemorrhage

×