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Article
July 8, 1933

HYPERINSULINISM: ITS SURGICAL TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.; BOSTON; ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1933;101(2):99-102. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740270003002
Abstract

Hyperinsulinism is the term suggested by Harris1 in 1924 in explanation of spontaneous hypoglycemia. If there is insufficient insulin, hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus develop; if insulin is excessive, hypoglycemia develops, with the characteristic symptoms seen after an overdose of insulin. The patient gives a history which in itself points to hypoglycemia; briefly, the history is some variant of the simple fact that when he becomes hungry he has trouble, and when he eats he is quickly relieved. The description of how he feels on these occasions varies from the mere sensation of weakness to attacks of unconsciousness and convulsions. The symptoms all occur when the blood sugar is low and disappear when it is restored to normal, although the complete return to normalcy may be delayed if the reaction has been especially severe. The patient may find that by eating frequently he can prevent the attacks, and as he

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