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Article
July 8, 1933

THE USE OF DEHYDRATION IN EPILEPSY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; WEST CHESTER, PA.
From the Pennsylvania Epileptic Hospital and Colony Farm, Oak-bourne, Pa., and from the Neurological Department of the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1933;101(2):110-111. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740270014005
Abstract

Rowntree1 and his co-workers, in a series of papers the first of which appeared in 1923, pointed out the effect that extremely large amounts of water have on animals if given by stomach tube. Water intoxication is characterized by restlessness, asthenia, polyuria, diarrhea, salivation, nausea, retching, vomiting, muscle tremor and twitching, ataxia, tonic and clonic convulsions, frothing at the mouth, stupor and perhaps death. The symptoms given in the foregoing sentence can be prevented by the timely administration of hypertonic solution of sodium chloride. Signs of water intoxication could not be produced except rarely if the water was given by rectum, intravenously or directly through a fistula into the duodenum. Rowntree reported an increase in intracranial pressure in his one flawless experiment. Lennox and Fremont-Smith found no increase in the spinal fluid pressure either in an epileptic patient who drank 1,000 cc. of water as rapidly as possible or

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