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Article
November 20, 1926

THE OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT IN THE TEACHING OF PEDIATRICS

JAMA. 1926;87(21):1704-1708. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680210010004
Abstract

It is only in recent times that the outpatient department of our medical schools and hospitals for children has shown encouraging symptoms of assuming its properposition as a teaching force. Dispensary work has long been, and in many quarters still is, considered a sort of necessary drudgery or apprenticeship that the younger man must serve for many years, partly to supply material for the older men in the wards, and partly to prepare the younger man for the more important house service of later years. I myself have never shared that point of view. This may have been, at first, largely due to the peculiar and limited clinical situation of my earlier years; but even today, with a large hospital and a very large material, I find myself instinctively heading for the outpatient department when I begin my daily rounds. To give to an outpatient department a maximum of attractiveness

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