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Article
November 27, 1926

GRANULOMA INGUINALE: ITS OCCURRENCE IN THE UNITED STATES: A REPORT OF FIFTEEN CASES OBSERVED IN NEW YORK

JAMA. 1926;87(22):1785-1790. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680220001001
Abstract

Granuloma inguinale is a chronic, infectious, ulcerative process, which usually involves the genitalia or neighboring parts, shows little or no tendency to spontaneous healing, and yields to treatment with antimony and potassium tartrate (tartar emetic).

The disease was probably first recognized in 1882 by MacLeod in India, who called it "serpiginous ulceration of the genitals." Conyers and Daniels, 1 in 1896, reporting cases from British Guiana, were the first accurately to describe the disease as a clinical entity. Galloway, 2 in the following year, reported a case in London and named the condition "ulcerating granuloma of the pudenda"; Grindon3 reported the first cases in the United States, while to Symmers and Frost 4 belongs the credit of being the first to recognize the Donovan bodies in cases seen in this country.

Granuloma inguinale has been called by various names, which are generally unsatisfactory. The disease is by no means

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