[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 15, 1933

FAULTY BLOOD GROUPING DUE TO AUTO-AGGLUTININS: AN UNUSUAL CASE

Author Affiliations

From the Achelis Laboratory of the Lenox Hill Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;101(3):207. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.27430280002012a
Abstract

For many years, serologists have been interested in the comparatively rare phenomenon of auto-agglutination. This has been quite clearly defined by Boxwell and Bigger1 in the following simple sentence: "Autohemagglutination is a clumping of erythrocytes into irregular masses, visible to the naked eye, occurring in the presence of the individual's own serum, without bacterial action, at air temperature and reversible at body temperature."

Landsteiner,2 Clough and Richter,3 Li Chen-Pien4 and other investigators have shown that the auto-agglutinins are present in the blood serum and are dependent on a lower than body temperature. They are absorbed from the serum at low temperature and fixed to the red blood cells. The auto-agglutinins can then be freed from the red cells by washing and suspending in warm saline solution, in which solution they can be demonstrated.

The case reported here is the first instance in our experience in which

×