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Article
November 22, 1930

SCHÖNLEIN-HENOCH'S PURPURA WITH INTRA-OCULAR HEMORRHAGE AND IRITISREPORT OF A CASE

JAMA. 1930;95(21):1577-1579. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720210031007
Abstract

The syndrome which came to be known as Schönlein-Henoch's purpura was called to attention by Henoch1 in 1874. He reported five cases, all in young persons, in which cutaneous eruptions and articular swellings were followed by colic, vomiting, intestinal hemorrhage, pain and moderate fever, without involvement of the heart. Groups of cases have been reported since in which various symptoms have been emphasized; some authors have remarked on the prevalence of arthritis, and others have remarked on the colic and abdominal pain. The reports have in common notation of the hemorrhages into the skin, of free blood in the intestinal tract and of nephritis. Schönlein, about 1832, emphasized the articular symptoms, which in many cases may be the first and most pronounced symptoms noted. The disease in later years has been referred to as Schönlein-Henoch's purpura, although according to Osler the first description of the condition was given by

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