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Article
July 22, 1933

IMPORTANCE OF CLINICAL-PATHOLOGIC CONFERENCES IN WORK OF THE PRACTITIONER AS TEACHER: CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;101(4):253-255. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740290001001
Abstract

The Council on Medical Education and Hospitals has assembled some striking figures in its most recent report.1 In 1932, there were 6,562 registered hospitals in the United States with a total capacity of more than 1,000,000 beds; the number of patients admitted to these hospitals during the year was 7,228,151. To carry on such a huge hospital practice, 7,757 interns and 2,018 resident physicians were employed. These 10,000 apprentices worked under the guidance of a teaching staff of 101,518 older and more experienced visiting men. On the shoulders of this visiting staff, therefore, falls the responsibility for carrying on the most important concerted effort at systematic postgraduate instruction that is being conducted in this country at the present moment.

Since more than 100,000 of the 125,000 practicing physicians in this country are directly associated or affiliated with hospitals, it follows that the vast majority of physicians who attend the

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