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Article
December 11, 1926

NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATIONS IN PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: A NEW CONCEPTION RELATIVE TO THE ETIOLOGY

JAMA. 1926;87(24):1957-1961. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680240001001
Abstract

Pernicious anemia as a disease entity was described first by Addison 1 in 1849. Biermer, 2 in 1872, furnished a good description of the disease. The former described the malady as idiopathic anemia, and the latter first used the term pernicious anemia. They were attracted to symptoms referable to the blood and gastro-intestinal systems. To honor these two pioneers, the English physicians frequently use the term Addison's anemia, and the Germans, Biermer's disease.

While some indefinite symptoms referable to the nervous system are mentioned by Little3 and Lichtenstern, 4 yet a real conception of an involvement of the central nervous system was reported first by Lichtheim5 in 1887. He described three cases with clinical neurologic manifestations arid a pathologic report recording posterior and lateral column degenerations. Putnam, 6 Dana, 7 Grainger Stewart8 and von Noorden, 9 in 1891, added materially to our clinical and pathologic knowledge of

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