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Article
January 8, 1927

PARALYSIS OF RIGHT DIAPHRAGM IN NEW-BORN DUE TO PHRENIC NERVE INJURY: REPORT OF CASE

Author Affiliations

DES MOINES, IOWA

JAMA. 1927;88(2):94-95. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680280024007
Abstract

D. M., a boy, aged 6 weeks, was brought to my office because of rapid respiration, and cyanosis on exertion such as crying. He was the first born of healthy parents; labor was prolonged thirty-two hours and then successfully terminated by forceps. There were four factors prolonging labor: The child was five weeks over time, he weighed 10 pounds and 7 ounces (4.7 Kg.), the birth was by face presentation, and the mother was a primipara. At birth, the cord was around the neck so tight that it seemed necessary to sever it. Accidently the scissors used must have entered the infant's neck on the right side, about an inch above the clavicle, just about the region of the scalene muscle and phrenic nerve. The rather deep incision in the neck soon healed, leaving a transverse scar. The first week of life, he slept almost constantly. Because of insufficient breast

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