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Article
January 22, 1927

ROENTGEN-RAY DIAGNOSIS OF PLEURAL EFFUSIONS, GENERAL AND LOCAL: THEIR RECOGNITION, LOCALIZATION AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Radiology, St. Louis University School of Medicine ST. LOUIS
From the roentgen-ray departments of St. Mary's Hospital and the St. Louis City Hospitals.

JAMA. 1927;88(4):215-218. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680300001001
Abstract

In no branch in the field of chest radiography is roentgen-ray examination of more importance than in the diagnosis of pleural effusions. The diagnosis of generalized pleural effusions, especially when associated with consolidation, is naturally very difficult owing to the confusion of physical signs; the detection of localized collections of fluid and the determination of their extent and location is often impossible. It is my object here to point out the usefulness of the roentgen ray, not only in the diagnosis of these conditions, but also in their localization. This paper is based on the study of 665 cases of pleural effusion treated at St. Mary's Hospital and the St. Louis City Hospitals during the last seven years.

Pleural effusions may be free in the pleural cavity, or may be pocketed or localized. Hydrothorax usually occurs from congestion as the result of cardiac incompetence, or from an intoxication, such as

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