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Article
January 29, 1927

CARCINOMA OF THE STOMACH: PRESENT STATUS OF DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1927;88(5):295-301. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680310007002
Abstract

In the light of modern medical progress, the traditional conception of gastric carcinoma is in need of revision. The familiar clinical picture of the disease is that of the frank or advanced stage. That potential or actual gastric carcinoma may exist with little or no dyspepsia, without loss of weight, color or appetite, and without anacidity or tumefaction, does not seem to be sufficiently appreciated. While these features are not new, it nevertheless seems necessary to repeat the actual facts not only to the laity but to the members of the medical profession. Progress in the earlier recognition and treatment of the disease has been, and continues to be, retarded by various factors. Medical texts and teaching persist in emphasizing the characteristics of the advanced or inoperable type of case. The layman too frequently continues to procrastinate in seeking competent medical advice for digestive disturbances of a kind he has

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