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Article
January 29, 1927

STUDIES IN TUBERCULOSIS: VIII. IDENTIFICATION OF A SKIN-REACTING SUBSTANCE IN BLOOD SERUMS FROM TUBERCULOUS PATIENTS AND ANIMALS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Medicine and the George Williams Hooper Foundation for Medical Research, University of California.

JAMA. 1927;88(5):313-315. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680310025007
Abstract

A biologic method has been devised for identifying a specific skin-reacting substance in the blood serum of tuberculous patients and animals. The point of departure was an earlier observation, reported elsewhere, 1 that sensitization in normal guinea-pigs could be accomplished with fractional tuberculins prepared from nonprotein substrates.

Duplicate series of healthy white guinea-pigs, weighing from 450 to 500 Gm., were used in each set of experiments. These were grouped as follows: (1) normal guinea-pigs previously injected with tuberculin fractions; (2) normal, untreated guinea-pigs, and (3) tuberculous guinea-pigs with early, moderately advanced and far advanced infections.

The animals were tested with (a) human serums from early and far advanced cases of tuberculosis; (b) the same serums heated at from 60 to 65 C. on a water bath for forty-five minutes; (c) normal human serum, and (d) guinea-pig serum from early and moribund stages of tuberculosis. Intracutaneous injections of 0.02 cc. of

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