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Article
September 16, 1933

SPONTANEOUS DISLOCATION OF THE LACRIMAL GLANDS: REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE, REPORT OF A CASE, AND TECHNIC OF SURGICAL CORRECTION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, New York Post-Graduate Medical School of Columbia University, Dr. Martin Cohen, director.

JAMA. 1933;101(12):905-910. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740370009003
Abstract

Displacement of the lacrimal gland occurs with greater frequency than can be inferred from modern textbooks on ophthalmology. In 1903, Roy1 presented a case of spontaneous prolapse of the lacrimal gland. Wadsworth2 stated that he had "seen a considerable number of cases of prolapse, none traumatic, and only one inflammatory. One case was bilateral in a middleaged man and had been present since childhood." Jackson3 cited two cases of spontaneous prolapse and stated that the condition was more common than the literature indicated. Since Roy's presentation only two references have been made to dislocation in this country, by Tyson4 in 1911 and by Curtin5 in 1915.

In 1895, the Russian ophthalmologist Golovin6 made the first report on bilateral displacement of the lacrimal gland and assigned to the disease the name "dislocatio glandulae lacrymalis spontanea sive glandula lacrymalis mobilis." He considered this condition as a

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