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Article
September 16, 1933

CHOLECYSTITIS: STUDY BASED ON FOLLOW-UP AFTER FROM FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS OF TWO HUNDRED PATIENTS NOT OPERATED ON

Author Affiliations

SEATTLE
From the Mason Clinic.

JAMA. 1933;101(12):910-913. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740370014004
Abstract

Disease of the gallbladder is diagnosed in our clinic more often than any other chronic intra-abdominal lesion. Twelve years ago we1 reported that gallbladder disease was found twice as frequently as peptic ulcer and gastric cancer combined and that it was the most common organic cause of dyspepsia. Nearly 6 per cent of all our patients over 20 years of age are diagnosed as having gallbladder disease. Yet pathologic studies show that ten times this percentage, or 60 per cent of adults, show cholecystopathies at routine autopsies.

CHOLECYSTOPATHY AT AUTOPSY  Autopsies recently performed (table 1) to study the gallbladder carefully have shown that cholecystitis and cholesterosis are the most common cholecystopathies, with stones frequently present. Stewart2 of Leeds reports a 16.4 per cent incidence of gallstones in 6,000 autopsies. Crump,3 recently working in Vienna, reports a 32.5 per cent incidence of gallstones and 60 per cent incidence

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