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Article
February 12, 1927

LIGHT HOOKWORM INFECTION: SHOULD PATIENTS BE "ADVISED THAT THEY ARE CARRIERS BUT DO NOT NEED TREATMENT"?

Author Affiliations

WILMINGTON, N. C.

JAMA. 1927;88(7):455-456. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680330007002
Abstract

One of the most important, suggestive and valuable factors in scientific work is a difference of opinion on a technical subject, for this leads to discussion and to advance of knowledge.

Recent literature on hookworm disease contains certain views which are exceedingly interesting; some of these represent distinct contributions to knowledge; some, however, seem to call for very careful consideration and reconsideration from points of view apparently not studied by their authors.

In comparing some of the newer with some of the older opinions, it is well to hold in mind an important premise; namely, that twenty years ago a person could stand on a downtown street corner, almost any Saturday afternoon (when many of the county inhabitants visit the cities and towns), in Wilmington, Raleigh, Charleston, Augusta, Macon or Meridian, and within two or three hours could observe from two to ten or more severe hookworm cases in the

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