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Article
February 12, 1927

TRYPARSAMIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF GENERAL PARALYSIS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Neurological Department, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the Psychopathic Service of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

JAMA. 1927;88(7):473-475. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680330025009
Abstract

Tryparsamide, a drug perfected by Jacobs and Heidelberger1 of the Rockefeller Foundation for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, was early suggested for use in syphilis, especially neurosyphilis. Those who first employed it soon discovered its inefficiency in the treatment of early syphilis, so that its use now is practically confined to trypanosomiasis, neurosyphilis and, by a few men, in states of lowered nutrition due to syphilis or other diseases.

The properties and the results of its experimental and early clinical use in trypanosomiasis were first reported by Brown and Pearce.2 Tryparsamide is a crystalline atoxyl derivative and a derivative of pentavalent arsenic. Experimentally,3 it was shown to be much less toxic than the drugs ordinarily used in the treatment of neurosyphilis, and in addition it has little cumulative action, although the margin of safety is narrow. The difference between a lethal and a toxic dose is small, but

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