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Article
October 7, 1933

DOES QUININE IN THE INDUCTION OF LABOR HAVE A DELETERIOUS EFFECT ON THE FETUS?

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Departments of Obstetrics, Tulane University of Louisiana School of Medicine, and Charity Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;101(15):1145-1148. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740400031009
Abstract

Quinine for many years has been credited with oxytocic properties, but there appears to be some difference of opinion as regards its efficiency when so employed. Sollmann1 states that "moderate doses of quinine stimulate, and high doses depress, the contractions and tone of the uterus, excised and in situ. The stimulant action increases with the excitability of the uterus in the process of pregnancy. Clinically, quinine has little or no effects unless the pains have started. It is therefore ineffective for inducing premature labor." He further states that it is used clinically to stimulate weak labor pains but adds that it is often difficult to prove the clinical response after oral administration because of the slow absorption.

Dodek,2 working in the same institution under Sollmann's guidance and employing a new recording apparatus, found that the drug had no effect when administered to two pregnant women at term and

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