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Article
March 5, 1927

IS MERCANTILE HEALTH SERVICE A DANGER OR AN ASSET TO MEDICAL PRACTICE?

JAMA. 1927;88(10):745. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680360057030

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —In The Journal, Dec. 25, 1926, p. 2180, is a review of "Health Control in Mercantile Life." The reviewer says: "Many physicians view with anxiety, if not with dread and alarm, present trends toward contract medical practice.... Is it for the good of the patients that they be treated with this type of service or is it preferable... that they be advised to select good physicians?"Kindly allow me to point out a few facts disclosed by this six year demonstration in store health work:An average of from six to twelve visits a year was voluntarily made by each person in at least a dozen stores where records were kept.The cost of each visit averaged about 50 cents because the work was organized to use effectively the time of the physician, the nurse, the dentist, the dental hygienist and sometimes the physical educator. Part of

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