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Article
March 12, 1927

PERINEAL PROSTATECTOMY UNDER SACRAL ANESTHESIA: ONE HUNDRED AND SEVEN CONSECUTIVE CASES WITH ONE DEATH

Author Affiliations

OMAHA
From the Department of Urology, University of Nebraska College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1927;88(11):784-786. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680370012004
Abstract

This paper has to do primarily with the mortality of prostatectomy. It is perhaps a surprising statement that this operation, in spite of the age and impaired renal function and general debility of the average candidate, has come to be classed among the comparatively "safe" surgical procedures. There are certain of the lesser major operations (among them, appendectomy and herniotomy) which may be undertaken almost without anxiety, on account of the minimum risk involved. In fact, there is, unfortunately, a growing tendency among members of the laity and the profession, secure in their reliance on modern antisepsis and technic, to ignore this risk entirely. As a result

of this too great faith, there arises a certain percentage of unnecessary surgical tragedy. Those who know through experience realize that the hazard of surgery may be reduced to a minimum but may never be entirely eliminated; that, in spite of the utmost

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