[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 19, 1927

A NEW PRINCIPLE IN THE SURGERY OF THE LARGE VESSELS: LIGATION OF VEIN PROXIMAL TO SITE OF LIGATION OF THE ARTERY: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Laboratory for Surgical Research, Stanford University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1927;88(12):909-911. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680380033014
Abstract

The age-old operation of ligation of an artery has within recent years undergone an important modification following recognition of the principle that the companion vein must also be occluded whenever injury or disease requires ligation of the main artery to an extremity. It is largely through the experiences and writings of Sir George Makins 1 that this development in a simple operation has become universally adopted. The clinical experiences of a lessened incidence of gangrene following its adoption have been corroborated experimentally by Drummond2 and by Brooks and Martin.3

Additional experimental evidence is now available in support of a further modification of the operation, which requires that under certain circumstances the ligation of the vein be performed at a considerable distance proximal to the site of ligation of the artery. The principle is particularly applicable to the ligation of the femoral and popliteal vessels, following which, as the

×