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Article
March 19, 1927

ROENTGEN-RAY EXAMINATION OF THE UTERUS AND FALLOPIAN TUBES WITH IODIZED OIL

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

JAMA. 1927;88(12):917-918. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680380041016
Abstract

The roentgenographic examination of certain hollow organs of the body, by means of material opaque to the roentgen rays, is now an everyday procedure. The employment of the contrast mediums, barium in the gastro-intestinal tract, bromides and iodides in the urinary tract, has put roentgen-ray diagnosis of these parts of the body on a sound basis. More recently, with the aid of iodized oil, it has been found possible to make radiographic studies of the bronchial tubes, and also of the uterus and fallopian tubes.

According to Forestier, Portiet of France, in 1923, was the first one to inject iodized oil into the uterine cavity for the purpose of roentgen-ray study. Probably the first published article relating to the subject was by Ferre,1 in October, 1925, when he reported six cases of uterine fibroma, diagnosed by the roentgen-ray.

Heuser 2 of Argentina was the first to employ this method

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